Wed 17th November 2010

birds : I have been very restrained with the birding these last two weeks. It would be very bad form, after a week birding away from the family, to be spending time in the field. Also my lunchtime and pre/post-work sessions have been restricted due to extra revision lessons, report-writing, detentions and poor weather. All these ramblings are of course excuses why my Guernsey year list is still 160 and three short of beating my record. So my target for the next month is to get these three species lopped off, which should be pretty straightforward since there are some obvious ones I haven't got yet (I won't say which as this will deffo jinx them!). This week I have been out more often but it has been wet and chilly and there's not a lot of life out there.

Little Grebe - Reservoir - 17 Nov 10

Little Grebe - Reservoir - 17 Nov 10

Fri 26th November 2010

birds : I am still very pedestrian on the birding at the moment, not helped by my second cold in just over a month. I have been popping into a few places - e.g, the first Great Crested Grebe of the winter at Grandes Havres, a lingering Common Sandpiper at Pulias Pond. I did squeeze in an hour or so in the Pleinmont area Sunday morning but there was just a few Skylark in the fields and regular Chaffinch passage going on. I did finally make headway in the year listing with a few Siskin in the trees by the garden early morning twice during the week. So very slow at the moment but it always is.

Thu 2nd December 2010

birds : I certainly wasn't expecting the sudden arrival of snow on the island last weekend, especially so early. I have never seen November snow in Guernsey before. There does seem to be a bit of a change in the winter weather in the island since I arrived. I saw no snow at all for the first five years I was here, perhaps the odd flake in the sky, but no proper, laying snow. But it has now snowed properly three years in a row, but if there is a change it is just probably cyclical.

So I woke up last Saturday to see snow on the ground, which is always a great sign for local birding since this generally pushes birds off the continent or Britain as it will be even colder there. A second small snowfall in the early morning on Monday, meant that all the schools were closed and I had a 3-day weekend. By lunchtime though it was fine weather and everyone was 'up in arms' about the skiving teachers and having to stay home to look after their children! But I didn't especially care as I was watching a Kingfisher on the rocks at Belle Greve Bay, which brought my year list to 162, which equalled my record! One more to get in a month - easy.

Early Wednesday morning there had been another small fall of snow but here in St. Sampsons it had not laid and I went to school. Up in the highlands of Beaucamps though the snow had laid and it continued to snowonand off all day with the fields all white. Only half the kids managed to make it into school - in one class I had one pupil - and of those lots were going home half-way through the day as it looked like it was getting worse. So if the Education Dept close the schools they get stick from half the people, and if they open them they get stick from everyone else. It was pretty cold and looked like it was to get worse. I stopped at Grandes Havres on the way home and had my first Slavonian Grebe of the winter and also a first-winter Common Gull. The thickest snowfall so far happened during the early hours today and I woke up to a totally white garden, and of course another day off work! Yay!!

view from the house

view from the house

I love walking in the snow, so before it all melted, I went for a wander from the house with my bins. I very rarely go birding by foot from home, and I decided to investigate the new footpath to St. Sampsons School. With this new footpath I could now easily walk to the Track Marais from home in just 20 minutes, and it was a wonderfully peaceful walk, well away from any traffic noise.

The track by the prison

The track by the prison

Immediately it was obvious that this fresh snowfall had brought birds in, with Lapwings being in the sky almost constantly during the morning, with finches and pipits flying about. Arriving at the Marais, it started snowing again and it looked very wild there. Two Marsh Harriers and a Buzzard flew around the marsh, and plenty of Snipe and a couple of Golden Plovers were flushed.

St Sampsons Marais (note the two Marsh Harriers by the distant pine)

St Sampsons Marais (note the two Marsh Harriers by the distant pine)

There were plenty of Meadow Pipits feeding on the icy pools and I saw one Reed Bunting fly in. Disappointingly I couldn't find any Jack Snipe. Along the lane on the way back I found a Mistle Thrush perched in a hawthorn, another good winter bird. As I passed the quarry at the end of the road I stuck my head over and saw that there were 4 Tufted Duck feeding there, and more surprisingly, a female Wigeon was with the Mallards.

Baubigny Quarry

Baubigny Quarry

The most surprising aspect of the day though was that I had not one, not two, but three new species for the house list in just a couple of hours. A Teal flew over with a small flock of Mallards - a Golden Plover went North over the house around lunchtime - and mid-afternoon a group of 5 Snipe shot over also. So that was very odd, but with these sudden cold snaps, anything is possible.

 

Fri 3rd December 2010

birds : Today dawned with very little snow here in St. Sampsons and so I was expecting a return to work. But no - most of the island's schools were still off. However, we had had a message from the headmaster to listen to the radio at 10 for an update. I was listening to the intellectual giant that is "Island FM" and at 10:15 they broadcast a message that most schools were opening, but schools x, y, z etc were going to stay closed. Ours wasn't listed so I quickly got dressed for work and packed a lunch and hurried off. When I drove up to the top of Beaucamps hill, it was much more snowy and icy but there wasn't exactly many people about. Apparently it was duff gen - it was closed after all!

Since I was out and about and had my birding gear with me I decided to make the most of it and set off for L'Eree where I expected to get the one species I needed for my record year-list. It soon became apparent exactly why the school was shut when I turned the corner to drive down the hill and promptly slid ten yards! Luckily I managed to stop and change to 4-wheel drive and crawled down the hill, where only a few hundred metres away, there was barely any ice or snow.

In L'Eree car park I joined Liz and Bob who were scanning L'Eree bay. Even though the tide was quite low, we had 5 Slavonian Grebes and 2 Great Northern Divers feeding just off the rocks. Then Bob picked up my main target and reason for being there, since they were found the previous day - a flock of 5 redhead Goosanders! Excellent - 163 for the year - my best ever in Guernsey. And a flock of 5 Goosander in local waters is an excellent record, the largest number that I can recall being here since I arrived. Then soon after that, I was looking through the waders on the beach and picked up a Knot - a second year-tick within a few minutes. After that I had a quick look on the Aerodrome before returning home and there were loads of birds feeding on there. Lapwings and Golden Plovers were dotted around and there was a flock of c.30 Dunlin just feeding in the grass, which they very rarely do there. I also found two more Knot along the side of the scrape, and a couple of White-fronted Geese - year-tick number three! White-front records on Guernsey are always a bit suspicious due to the feral flock which we have here, but those birds generally stick to the North of the island, and these two were part of a group of 13 which arrived on the Aerodrome in the cold weather a couple of days ago, so I'd give them the benefit of the doubt. And they looked very smart with superb black barring on the belly - unlike the feral chav ones up in the north.

Knot - Old Aerodrome - 3 Dec 10

Knot - Old Aerodrome - 3 Dec 10

White-fronted GEESE - Old Aerodrome - 3 Dec 10

White-fronted GEESE - Old Aerodrome - 3 Dec 10

"I say, Charles, do we have to go for a drink at this pool? It appears to be frequented by common folk"

"I say, Charles, do we have to go for a drink at this pool? It appears to be frequented by common folk"

Fri 10th December 2010

birds : Another week without being able to get out birding very much. The highlight was on Monday when I had a Great Northern Diver at Grandes Rocques in the morning, followed by a group of three divers at Grandes Havres in the afternoon - 2 Great Northerns and a Black-throated. I am looking closely at the divers this winter to see if the Pacific comes back again, like the Cornish and Welsh birds did.

Fri 17th December 2010

birds : This week has been a dipping week really. At the weekend I rushed up to Vale Pond to see a Bittern but no sign. I went to Grande Mare to see the Goldeneye but it was nowhere to be seen. I looked for Red-breasted Mergansers to no avail. I couldn't even find the Water Pipit on Wednesday. It is a good job that I have already beaten my year list or I would be panicking at the moment. I did see a female Goosander feeding in Belle Greve Bay on Sunday.

Bar-tailed Godwit - vazon - 15 Dec 10

Bar-tailed Godwit - vazon - 15 Dec 10

Tue 21st December 2010

birds : With a short time free after some shopping in town (by shopping I mean visiting a few shops and collecting vouchers), I popped to the Grande Mare to have another look for the Goldeneye that I missed last week. This time it was feeding actively on the main pond and showing well.

Goldeneye - Grande Mare - 21 Dec 10

Goldeneye - Grande Mare - 21 Dec 10

One reason that I did want to see the bird was that on some photos I'd seen, it seemed to have an unusually pale bill. There is a lot of pale on the bill but it was not very extensive or obvious in the field, and the head shape was nothing out of the ordinary to be the other species. Nevertheless, a very rare species for Guernsey, this is only the third record in the last ten years. Oddly though it was a regular visitor in the 1970's, 80's and 90's, but suddenly tailed off. Also on the same lake were a flock of 2 male and 2 female Pochard, not a common species here either.

Pochards - Grande Mare - 21 Dec 10

Pochards - Grande Mare - 21 Dec 10

Pochards - Grande Mare - 21 Dec 10

Pochards - Grande Mare - 21 Dec 10

Sat 25th December 2010

birds : A Merry Christmas to everyone! Although I had a Christmas Day totally at home this year, I enjoyed watching a female Blackcap in the hedges opposite feeding on berries and a small flock of Lapwings flying around. I managed to get out for a couple of hours yesterday morning, and had what will probably be my final new bird for the year, when a pair of Red-breasted Mergansers flew past Chouet. There are lots of gulls around at the moment but I wasn't keen to search through them as the wind was strong and coming straight off the rubbish tip. Just offshore though in the surf were a couple of Common Gulls, which were soon joined by two more - 2 ads and 2 1st-w. Common Gulls are not at all common of course in Guernsey, and such groups only ever arrive during severe weather elsewhere.

Common Gull - Chouet, 24 Dec 10

Common Gull - Chouet, 24 Dec 10

After watching the gulls, I checked out Marais Nord,but again the stiff wind was affecting the small birds too and I only found single Firecrest and Chiffchaff.

Tue 28th December 2010

birds : After three days of being mainly inside doing lots of Christmassing (which mainly involved me elbowing the kids out of the way so I could play on the new Wii),  I was pleased to be able to get out this afternoon for some birding. My first port of call was L'Ancresse/Pembroke Bay (I have no idea why this bay seems to have two names, but quite a few sites in Guernsey do) where a Long-tailed Duck had turned up on Boxing Day. The tide was high and viewing conditions were good, but it took me ages before I spotted the bird. This was because it was feeding very actively, diving deeply and only pausing briefly between dives. Also it was not that close inshore, so photographs were almost impossible.

Long-tailed Duck - L'Ancresse Bay, 28 Dec 10

Long-tailed Duck - L'Ancresse Bay, 28 Dec 10

Long-tailed Duck is a major rarity in Guernsey with only 12 previous records, and this is the first twitchable one since 1997 when a male was in this same bay. This was before I arrived in Guernsey, but I did see the next bird when one landed on the sea off Jaonneuse Point in October 1998 whilst I was seawatching. I didn't really appreciate how rare it was at the time. I am presuming that this is a male bird due to the clear pink spot on the bill, and no doubt a first winter. The odd pale grey feather is coming through the brown.I spent the next hour searching various spots in the Vale for the Cattle Egret that had been seen at a couple of sites on Christmas Day. I couldn't find it though and I saw little else apart from a Great Northern Diver off Chouet, but as I returned home I received a tip-off (thanks Dave) that a Bittern was showing exceptionally well at the Grand Pre.

So I headed back out again and yomped down to the hide and straight away I could see the Bittern stalking along the edge of the pond just inside the reed edge, really close to the hide. I scrambled out the camera but I was concerned it was now very late afternoon and the light was going. I then realised that the bird was in fact far too close to get it all in the frame. But I got a few pics in the end despite the problems.

Bittern - Grand Pre, 28 Dec 10

Bittern - Grand Pre, 28 Dec 10

In the above photo you can see the vignetting in the corners as I could only just get it into the scope. It was interesting to watch how the bird fed. It found a new spot a yard or so ahead, then reached down low and dipped its bill into the water.

It then turned its head sideways so that its eye was just above the surface of the water, and it appeared to be peering into the shallows looking for movement, before snapping up any prey that it saw.

Although Bitterns are annual winter visitors at the moment to Guernsey, this was the first one I had seen here since 2002, so it was a very welcome sighting. On the way out of the reserve asit was getting dusky, two Firecrests were showing well and calling beside the path.

Upon returning home, I discovered that the Cattle Egret had been re-found in St. Martins - no wonder I couldn't find it - and also later this evening, a flock of 4 Waxwings had been seen on Christmas Day in a Castel garden. I know where I am going tomorrow!

Wed 29th December 2010

birds : So this morning I went searching for the Waxwings that were reported a few days ago. I found the little clos and walked in there, bins-less so as to not worry the residents. I couldn't see them in the Highlands Estate clos where they had been, and had a half-hour walk round the general area with no luck. I thought they might still be around though, as Waxwings tend to appear and disappear suddenly in the same trees as they go around their feeding circuits. So I was going to check again later. I also went for a brief search for the Cattle Egret but there was also no sign - so not a terrific start.

Later on in the afternoon I got a call to say that some of the guys were watching a single Waxwing in the same clos and it was showing exceptionally well. I had to wait a while until Rosie came home but I shot back there late in the afternoon. Now with better directions I found the correct garden and straight away saw the Waxwing sat in the centre of a large berry tree. I kicked myself that, this morning I may have seen it first time if I had've walked just 20 yards further into the estate as this tree was hidden behind a wall from where I looked from earlier.

Waxwing - Highland Est - 29 Dec 10

Waxwing - Highland Est - 29 Dec 10

Unfortunately, the bird was not so helpful for photography since it was staying right in the middle of the tree and it was difficult to find a spot where it wasn't obscured. Looking in detail at the wing pattern (below) it appears that it is a first-winter bird since the primaries only have white/yellow in the outer web, which does not curve around the tips to the inner web as on an adult bird. This bird has two very worn, paler brown outer primaries.

It was a superb bird and it was terrific to watch it at such close range. It seems to have lost the rest of the flock, which may mean that it needed to feed up and regain energy compared to the other three. There are plenty of berries left on the tree, so it may stay for quite a few more days.

With this bird and the two yesterday, this brings me up to 170 for the year list, which would be a very nice total to finish on.

Fri 31st December 2010

birds : There are now 7 Waxwings in the Castel flock and I went down mid-morning to see them. However, I did not see a flock, just another single bird - but a different one than the one I saw the other day. This one was coming down to apples in a garden by the main road next to the Hotel de Beauvoir along Rue Cohu. It showed exceptionally well, but again was difficult to photograph due to the bright sun in the wrong place, and being obscured by hedges or fences or twigs etc. But it was a superb ending to 2010 - a beautiful bird on a beautiful winters day.

Waxwing - Rue Cohu , 31 Dec 10

Waxwing - Rue Cohu , 31 Dec 10

Fri 7th January 2011

birds : The first week of the year has been a pretty dreary affair, with rain and cloud dominating the weather and the return to work always cheerful, not. The exciting bird arrivals during the last week of last year have not continued and nothing new has come to the island.

I saw the Long-tailed Duck again - much closer this time feeding in the surf just off the beach, although I didn't have my camera which was a shame. I was with Anais who was so pleased to get LTD on her list, that she decided to run into the sea, forgetting that it was January and she was fully clothed. I also called in to see the Waxwing again - I could go back time and time again to see this species. One bird seems to be sticking to the apples along Rue Cohu which is pretty close to my school. It was showing on the correct side of the tree this time, so I managed a few unobscured photos, although it was exceptionally dull and rainy, and I had to just use the car window as a rest for the 'scope. Still haven't managed what I would call a 'cracking' shot of it yet.

Waxwing, Rue Cohu, 5 Jan 11 - looking a bit wet, note the raindrop on the right primaries

Waxwing, Rue Cohu, 5 Jan 11 - looking a bit wet, note the raindrop on the right primaries

I finally managed to import some Firecrest calls that I recorded at the Grand Pre after I saw the Bittern a week or so ago. They are much more distinct and clear that Goldcrest calls, more of an obvious "peep peep peep".

spectrogram of Firecrest calls, Grand Pre, Dec 2010

moths : The first moth of the year, at the kitchen window on New Years Day evening - a presumed Acleris hastiana.